10°

Lake Country Weather

  • Log-in Edit profile
  • Register Logout

Advertisement

Bending light for microscopic measurement

Mukwonago students use laser in learning how researchers examine the super small

Feb. 5, 2013

What does it mean to win by a hair? A group of Mukwonago High School Advanced Placement students in Kristin Michalski's class recently used a laser to determine the slim margin provided by winning by a hair.

Building off a November visit to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Raicu Lab, where students performed measurements on a Two-photon microscope, the students expanded their understanding of the structure of matter at the microscopic level and how researchers see very small structures. During that visit students learned the safety precautions needed when using powerful lasers. They learned why certain microscopes are suited for different structures such as proteins or bacteria. They also learned how to prepare microscope slides with fluorescent samples before capturing the image with a Two-photon microscope, Michalski explained.

The fluorescent sample was used to show students how the microscope measures the photon emission spectrum and how it is used to calibrate the microscope, according to Michalski.

The students also analyzed some data to gain understanding of how light is distorted by the microscope so they can compensate for this when analyzing data when imaging living structures.

With this background information, students taped human hair to a mounting bracket, lined up a laser on top of a wood block and aimed the light at the hair until a pattern of diffracted light appeared on a white paper background.

As they worked through the lab on human hair, their visit to the UW-Milwaukee became a bit clearer.

While the UW-Milwaukee lab visit was a bit "hard to follow," Senior Taylor Geiger said, "I think I understand it better now."

Measuring the distance between bands of light diffracted by the hair - with thinner hair producing wider bands of light from the laser - students calculated the width of hair. To help determine the accuracy of their work, students confirmed if their measurement fell within the average range of width of human hair, which is 17 to 181 micrometers.

Visiting UW-Milwaukee and performing experiments at the college exposes students to "real science discovery," Michalski explained. The experience engages students as they make career choices and decisions about future studies beyond medicine and engineering. The opportunity allows students to learn how real scientists work and demonstrates the importance of research and the active role students can play in scientific research.

By working with real scientists, students get a glimpse of the people behind the microscopes, Michalski added. As students tackle the challenge of AP physics, hoping to earn some college credit, the university visit helps them connect what they are learning in class with current biophysical research.

The AP course may provide some students with a jump start on college, but for Lily Larson, who likes "all the Stephen Hawkings stuff" and is thinking of becoming a physicist, she's ready to dig beyond the "surface stuff."

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Special Sections

 

Menu+Guide

       Summer Fun 2014                 Menu Guide

Special sections archive

 

Weekend Happenings

Featured this week:  

UnXpected Thanksgiving Eve Bash: 8 p.m. Nov. 26, Sussex Bowl, N64 W24576 Main St., Sussex. Come party with the UnXpected at the annual Sussex Bowl Thanksgiving Eve bash. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. ACME Rocket Skates is opening the show at 8 p.m. and The UnXpected will take the stage at 9 p.m. Free.

 

Country Christmas Outdoor Drive-through Lights Display: Nov. 27-30, Dec. 5-31. Country Springs Hotel, 2810 Golf Road, Pewaukee. Wisconsin's largest drive-through holiday lights event features more than a million holiday lights along a mile-long trail that winds through the woods, Includes animated figures and holiday scenes. Call (262) 970-5398 for details. $15-$25. $15 per carload, $25 limo, mini-coach or large van. www.thecountrychristmas.com

 

World's Greatest Cookie Sale: Noon Nov. 28, Country Springs Hotel, 2810 Golf Road, Pewaukee. Sale features homemade holiday cookies and baked goods in many varieties. Twenty-five nonprofit groups will sell to the thousands who attend this event each year. Proceeds go directly to the nonprofits. Entertainment includes magic shows, cookie and cupcake decorating, face painting, holiday coloring contest and Santa and Mrs. Claus. Sale ends at 4 p.m. For more information on the World's Greatest Cookie Sale, call Country Springs, (262) 547-0201 or visit thecountrychristmas.com/cookiesale. Free.

 

Christmas Magic: 2 p.m. Nov. 30, Main Mill/AJ'S Live, W16521 Main St., Menomonee Falls. Magician John Lewit performs a fun Christmas themed magic show for the whole family. Free.

Updates to this calendar are made weekly Monday afternoon. 

 

All weekend happenings.