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Incumbent, challengers at odds in Wisconsin 33rd Assembly race

Oct. 16, 2012

Democrat Scott Woods and Libertarian Terry Virgil disagree with incumbent Steve Nass, a Republican, on Act 10 and the voter ID law as the three battle for a seat in the 33rd Assembly District.

The Chief posed questions on several issues; the candidates were asked to limit their answers to 50 words.

Q: What's your highest priority? How would you address this?

Nass: Jobs and the economy. Elected officials must adopt the core principle that government doesn't create private-sector jobs. The business owners and entrepreneurs of this state are the only real economic engine that can sustain long-term job growth. State government must eliminate burdensome regulations and lower taxes on small business owners.

Woods: Making life better for our kids and grandkids and all of us. Fair laws will create jobs. Benefits proportional to time worked. Workers able to deduct costs of working, such as gasoline, etc. Lower taxes for more hours worked, since our hours are our only natural resource.

 

Virgil: The economy would be my most highest, combined with jobs. I believe in entrepreneur developing the economy.

 

Q: What's your stance on Act 10?

Nass: I voted in favor of this law. This taxpayer-friendly reform has successfully restored fiscal sanity in the compensation process for public sector employees. It also returned control of government back to the voters and diminished the power of public sector union bosses in Madison.

Woods: It should be repealed. Unions are necessary to stand up for fair treatment. Unions got us down from 80-plus hours/work week to 40 normally and overtime for more than that. Our hours are our only natural resource, and it is fair to be compensated more as more are used.

Virgil: Repeal it, or fix it.

Q: Beyond initiatives already in place, what can the state do to attract businesses?

Nass: Gov. (Jim) Doyle's last state budget drove Wisconsin taxes to the ninth highest in the country. We need to reduce taxes on businesses and families. Also, we must market Wisconsin's strengths to reach a diversified group of businesses in all sectors of the economy. Wisconsin's past approach to business recruitment was too narrowly focused.

Woods: Enact fair laws, as I have suggested above. Lower taxes and incremental higher pay for longer work hours will attract entrepreneurs and be more fair for all our workers. It will lead business to higher more people not less and give more leisure time, which will pump up the economy.

Virgil: Fix the higher education in the state; make it easier for entrepreneurs to develop.

Q: Should the state implement a voter ID law?

Nass: I voted in favor of the Wisconsin voter ID law. The state must take action to prevent voter fraud and protect the integrity of our electoral process. Unfortunately, the Wisconsin law was temporarily blocked by a liberal Dane County judge; I am confident the Wisconsin Supreme Court will restore the law on appeal.

Woods: We don't need a voter ID law beyond what we have; there is no significant evidence of voter fraud. The current law is an attempt at voter suppression and also doesn't stop voter fraud but makes it available only to those with more money and resources.

Virgil: No, this is a direct violation of the U.S. Constitution.

Steve NassSteve Nass (inc)

Previously held offices: Whitewater City Council, 1977-81; Assembly since 1990

Education: University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, bachelor's degree in 1978 and master's in 1990

Military: Wisconsin Air National Guard (retired, 33 years of service)

Scott WoodsScott Woods

Previously held offices: Delavan Zoning Board of Review

Education: UW-Madison, bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1977

Military: Drafted in 1970 but not inducted due to a slight disability.

 Terry Virgil

Previously held offices: None

Education: Associate's degree in art of business administration, American Intercontinental University, currently in legal studies through Kaplan University.

Military: U.S. Marine Corps, 1978-81

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Weekend Happenings

Featured this week:  

The Art of the Bicycle: 11 a.m. Nov. 21, 26, Delafield Arts Center, 719 Genesee St., Delafield. Diane Lehman, Peter Kudlata and Wheel & Sprocket. Gallery hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. first and third Saturdays and by appointment, Free www.delafieldartscenter.org.

Organ Concert: 1:30 p.m. Nov. 21, St. Jerome Catholic Church, 995 S. Silver Lake St., Oconomowoc. Oconomowoc Music Club is hosting a concert by renowned organist Dr. Simone Gheller. Refreshments will be served after the concert. Free.

Yuletide Faire: 5-9 p.m. Nov. 21; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 22, Prairie Hill Waldorf School, N14-W29143 Silvernail Road, Pewaukee. $4 in advance or $5 at the door for adults and $1 in advance or $2 at the door for children under 15. Features strolling minstrels and costumed characters, puppet shows, storytelling, candle dipping, face painting, children’s craft workshops, children’s holiday shopping, live music, silent auction, children’s book sale, natural toys, 35 vendors, warm food, homemade desserts, candies, nuts and other treats. 

Fashionable Tidings Gala Luncheon: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 22, Country Springs Hotel, 2810 Golf Road, Pewaukee. Holiday fashions of local clothiers Paul Bruce Goodman and Liebling Leather. Music by Brusubardis String Ensemble. Lunch includes shrimp scamp and angel hair pasta with vegetables provencale. Wine tasting  and auction. Benefits Waukesha Choral Union. $35. Call (414) 297-9310 for tickets. www.choralunion.org.

Updates to this calendar are made weekly Monday afternoon. 

 

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